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Archive for the ‘Tagalog Language Entry’ Category

U.S. politicians debate whether to force Trump’s interpreter to divulge contents of the private meeting. Read more…

 

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The lack of accredited interpreters continues to be a challenge for the court system, a new ruling indicates.Read here.

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If the projections are correct, nearly half of San Francisco’s courtrooms will be shuttered soon, due to a $350 million hit to the state judiciary. Drastic doesn’t even begin to describe it. Think of it as Armageddon in robes. Read here.

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PROVIDENCE, R.I.—The trial of a United Arab Emirates naval officer accused of keeping an unpaid servant in his Rhode Island home was put on hold for two days after the defense raised concerns about the accuracy of the translation service provided by an interpreter assisting the prosecution’s star witness. Read here.

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Court cases in Ottawa could stall as freelance interpreters refuse to work for wages that they say have barely changed in 15 years. With only three staff interpreters, Ottawa courts rely heavily on the area’s 100-some freelancers, who provide interpretations in languages ranging from French to Farsi. Read here.

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A law that requires mortgage loan documents to be translated into the language in which the verbal negotiations were conducted became effective on July 1, 2010. This law, AB 1160, requires a supervised financial organization, as defined, that negotiates primarily in Spanish, Chinese, Tagalog, Vietnamese, or Korean in the course of entering into a contract or agreement for a loan or extension of credit secured by residential real property, to deliver, prior to the execution of the contract or agreement, and no later than 3 business days after receiving the written application, a specified form in that language summarizing the terms of the contract or agreement, as specified. Read here.

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Watch the new interpreter candidate videos for an overview of court interpreting as a career and to learn about the California Judicial Council testing process. Watch here.

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In the health care industry, non-English speaking patients represent a major challenge to medical and emergency personnel, who have to provide care without being able to properly interact with the patient. In addition, they also represent legal and financial issues for hospitals.

To help solve the language problem, InterLingua Medical Publishing has introduced a series of innovative and cost-oriented medical manuals called Medical Point2’s. The Medical Point2’s allow non-English speaking patients to communicate with medical and emergency personnel simply by pointing to questions and answers.

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In the two and a half years Elsa Velasquez Ward has been Midland Memorial Hospital’s cultural diversity coordinator, more employees are making it a habit to call on her interpreters to help make the health care experience more comfortable for non-English speakers.

Her hiring in 2007 was part of the hospital’s ongoing quality improvement efforts. “Nurses are calling on me more, not only for interpretation” but to show cultural respect, Ward said.

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For the interpreter or translator venturing into a court for the first time the process can be somewhat daunting. Court hearings have their own nuances and particularities the interpreter may not appreciate if their experience is mainly from the health or business world.

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